An Analysis Of Fast Systems Of Dentures

Dental dentures are artificial replacements used for your natural teeth and gums. If an accident, poor dental health, or disease has caused you to have only a few healthy natural teeth or none at all, a dentist or prothodontist will recommend dentures to replace the missing teeth.check this link right here now

Dentures are most ideal if you have significant erosion of the gum and jaw line which makes other dental procedures such as crowns and implants less desirable. They also may be used to replace an entire row of teeth rather than a single tooth.

The ideal candidate for dentures

Because dentures are relatively non-invasive, they are well suited to people who are unwilling to go through a more extensive dental procedure such as that used for dental implants.

Elderly people who cannot sit still for a long visit in a dentist’s chair are ideal candidates for dentures. Some people also have eroded their teeth and jaw line to the point that it is difficult to do a crown or dental bridge.

Dentures also may suit you if you are missing a row of several teeth or your entire top or bottom teeth in a line. In these cases it may be easier and less expensive to get an entire set of false teeth rather than trying to rebuild each lost tooth.

What will the Dentist do first?

Your dentist will make impressions of your mouth and fit you with a false tooth or set of teeth that are molded based on the shape of your mouth. You will be asked to bite down on something to check for fitting. The dentures are affixed in place with an adhesive that you can buy in most chain grocery or drug stores.

What are the different types of dentures?

1. Complete Dentures

These dentures replace all of the teeth and are what we often refer to as “false teeth”. They are made of colored plastic base to duplicate the gum tissue and the artificial teeth are made either of porcelain or plastic. Complete dentures are held in place in the mouth by suction, thus forming a seal to the gums, or they can also be attached to dental implants which are placed into the jaw bone through surgical procedure. However, the use of dental implants cost more than the traditional way of attaching complete dentures.

Most people might experience soreness at first during the initial placement of complete dentures and it might take them some time to get used to it. Immediate dentures and conventional dentures are the two types of complete dentures.

Immediate dentures are made in advance and are placed right after your teeth are extracted. Your dentist will first take measurements and models of your jaw and teeth during the first visit to make the immediate dentures. One advantage of immediate dentures is that you don’t have to go without teeth during the healing period (which can usually take up to six months). This type of complete dentures also act as a protection for the tissues and can reduce bleeding after the extraction of the teeth. However, one drawback is that immediate dentures require frequent adjustments during the healing period when the bones and gums shrink over time from reduced swelling.
Conventional dentures are placed in position after the jaw and gum tissues have healed, usually about 8-12 weeks after the tooth/teeth extraction, but sometimes longer.